how to write analysis and discussion

how to write analysis and discussion

The results section should aim to narrate the findings without trying to interpret or evaluate, and also provide a direction to the discussion section of the research paper. The results are reported and reveals the analysis. The analysis section is where the writer describes what was done with the data found. In order to write the analysis section it is important to know what the analysis consisted of, but does not mean data is needed. The analysis should already be performed to write the results section.
How should the results section be written?

Answer your research question
Conclude by summarising the implications of your findings in brief, and explain why they are important for researchers and in practice, and provide some suggestions for further work.

Placing the research in context
But what if you undertook a more quantitative type study? You might be better off structuring your findings chapter in relation to your research questions or your hypotheses. This assumes, of course, that you have more than one research question or hypothesis. Otherwise you would end up just having one really long section.

How to write analysis and discussion
Example: The object motion prediction is done by incorporating human experience in the form of fuzzy inference rules. It is assumed that, the environment is observed through stereo vision technique. The observed environment covers semi circular area in front of the Robot.
Example: On critical observation of the graphs in environments where number of objects are less and response time is critical Min-Max method can be used as its response time is better as compared to COA and MOM methods.

This article gives doctoral dissertation students valuable guidance on how to go about writing their Discussion chapter. The article starts by outlining the main goals and writing approaches. Then the article explains 12 specific steps to take to write an effective Discussion chapter.

  1. Always try to structure your Discussion chapter from the ‘specific’ to the ‘general’: expand and transition from the narrow confines of your study to the general framework of your discipline.
  2. Make a consistent effort to stick with the same general tone of the introduction. This means using the same key terms, the same tense, and the same point of view as used in your introduction.
  3. Start by rewriting your research questions and re-stating your hypothesis (if any) that you previously posed in your introduction. Then declare the answers to your research questions – make sure to support these answers with the findings of your dissertation.
  4. Continue by explaining how your results relate to the expectations of your study and to literature. Clearly explain why these results are acceptable and how they consistently fit in with previously published knowledge about the subject. Be sure to use relevant citations.
  5. Make sure to give the proper attention for all the results relating to your research questions, this is regardless of whether or not the findings were statistically significant.
  6. Don’t forget to tell your audience about the patterns, principles, and key relationships shown by each of your major findings and then put them into perspective. The sequencing of this information is important: 1) state the answer, 2) show the relevant results and 3) cite the work of credible sources. When necessary, point the audience to figures and/or graphs to ‘enhance’ your argument.
  7. Make sure to defend your answers. Try to do so in two ways: by explaining the validity of your answer and by showing the shortcomings of others’ answers. You will make your point of view more convincing if you give both sides to the argument.
  8. Also make sure to identify conflicting data in your work. Make a good point of discussing and evaluating any conflicting explanations of your results. This is an effective way to win over your audience and make them sympathetic to any true knowledge your study might have to offer.
  9. Make sure to include a discussion of any unexpected findings. When doing this, begin with a paragraph about the finding and then describe it. Also identify potential limitations and weaknesses inherent in your study. Then comment on the importance of these limitations to the interpretation of your findings and how they may impact their validity. Do not use an apologetic tone in this section. Every study has limitations.
  10. Conduct a brief summary of the principal implications of your findings (do this regardless of any statistical significance). Make sure to provide 1-2 recommendations for potential research in the future.
  11. Show how the results of your study and their conclusions are significant and how they impact our understanding of the problem(s) that your dissertation examines.
  12. On a final note, discuss everything this is relevant but be brief, specific, and to the point.

References:

http://www.skillsyouneed.com/learn/dissertation-results-discussion.html
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/dissertation-findings-discussion-sections/
http://www.researchvoyage.com/how-to-write-discussion-analysis-section-of-a-research-paper/
http://dissertationgenius.com/12-steps-write-effective-discussion-chapter/
http://writemyessay4me.org/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *