how to introduce a quote in an essay

how to introduce a quote in an essay

Semicolons and colons go outside of the final quotation mark (“like this”;).
These rules oversimplify the use of punctuation with quotations, but applying just these few rules should help you use the correct punctuation about 90 percent of time.

The ancient Greeks never saw a need to justify wars that were waged outside the walls of the city state. In On Revolution, Hannah Arendt points to the role the Romans played in laying the foundation for later thinking about the ethics of waging war: “we must turn to Roman antiquity to find the first justification of war, together with the first notion that there are just and unjust wars” (12). Yet the Roman conception of a just war differs sharply from more modern conceptions.
The ancient Greeks never saw a need to justify wars that were waged outside the walls of the city state. As Hannah Arendt points out in On Revolution, “we must turn to Roman antiquity to find the first justification of war, together with the first notion that there are just and unjust wars” (12). Yet the Roman conception of a just war differs sharply from more modern conceptions.

How to introduce a quote in an essay
The things they carried were largely determined by necessity. Among the necessities or near-necessities were P-38 can openers, pocket knives, heat tabs, wristwatches, dog tags, mosquito repellent, chewing gum, candy cigarettes, salt tablets, packets of Kool-Aid, lighters, matches, sewing kits, Military Payment Certificates, C rations, and two or three canteens of water.” (O’Brien 2)

Variation: When you’re citing two or more paragraphs, you must use block quotes, even if the passage you want to quote is less than four lines long. You should indent the first line of each paragraph an extra quarter inch. Then, use ellipses (…) at the end of one paragraph to transition to the next.

How to introduce a quote in an essay
If you need to quote a source after a full sentence, introduce it with a colon:
Finally, for longer quotations, use a block quote. These are also introduced with a colon, but they don’t have to follow a full sentence. Furthermore, quoted text should be indented and the block quote should begin on a new line. For example, we could introduce a block quote as follows:

        • By calling them ignorant, the author implies that they were unschooled and narrow minded (author’s last name p.##).
        • Her preoccupation with her looks suggests that she is too superficial to make her a believable character (author’s last name p.##).
        • Based on his research, we can assume Hatfield thinks that our treatment of our environment has been careless (author’s last name p.##).

The author agrees . . .The author rejects. The author argues. The author compares. (the two studies) The author asserts. The author admits. The author cautions. The author disputes. The author emphasizes. The author contends. The author insists. The author denies. The author maintains. The author refutes. The author claims. The author endorses.

References:

http://advice.writing.utoronto.ca/using-sources/quotations/
http://www.wikihow.com/Put-a-Quote-in-an-Essay
http://getproofed.com/writing-tips/how-to-introduce-quotes-in-academic-writing/
http://www.gallaudet.edu/tutorial-and-instructional-programs/english-center/the-process-and-type-of-writing/words-that-introduce-quotes-or-paraphrases
http://alliant.libguides.com/c.php?g=692717&p=4907987