how can i make a opening argument for a literary analysis paper

how can i make a opening argument for a literary analysis paper

5. explanation of the quote in your own words.
INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH: This paragraph should tell the reader what your paper is going to be about. The following information (not necessarily in this order) needs to be included in an introductory paragraph:

How can i make a opening argument for a literary analysis paper
2. Body part

  • Topic sentence #1 along with the claim, supporting evidence, and tie (3 times each)
  • Topic sentence #2 along with the claim, supporting evidence, and tie (3 times each)
  • Topic sentence #3 along with the claim, supporting evidence, and tie (3 times each)

How can i make a opening argument for a literary analysis paper
Your first sentence sets the tone for the whole essay, so spend some time on writing an effective hook. Avoid long, dense sentences — start with something clear, concise and catchy, and make sure it’s directly relevant to what follows. Some strategies to write a hook include:
This sentence makes a bold claim that emphasizes the importance of the topic, but it doesn’t over-generalize. It gives a good idea of the essay’s general purpose and approach, but doesn’t give away too much information.

5. Studies suggest that over 90% of the meaning we derive from communication, we derive from the non-verbal cues. These nonverbal cues include body language, facial expression, eye movement and contact, posture, gestures, use of touch (such as hug or handshake), vocal intonation, rate of speech, and the information we gather from appearance (Applebaum, 108). It’s terrible to think that such important things are said with only a mere 10% of their meaning being properly conveyed. Phone calls can eliminate some of these problems.

    • What aspects of this evidence would I like my audience to notice?
    • Why did I choose this particular piece of evidence?
    • Why does this evidence matter to my argument?
    • Why is this evidence important in some ways, but not in others?
    • How does this evidence contradict or confirm my argument? Does it do both?
    • How does this evidence evolve or change my argument?

When you’re taking a literature course, you clearly expect some degree of academic writing to be involved. You’ll be reading books, and you’ll be discussing them in class. However, you’ll also analyze those books in written.
Each paragraph needs a topic sentence, which is directly related to the thesis statement.

References:

http://writemyessay4me.org/blog/analytical-essay
http://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/introduction/
http://lsa.umich.edu/sweetland/undergraduates/writing-guides/how-can-i-create-stronger-analysis-.html
http://www.bestessaytips.com/literary_essay.php
http://sciencefair.math.iit.edu/projects/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *